5 Beiträge / 0 neu
Letzter Beitrag
#1 2018-12-14 11:26

Ways to Improve Animations?

I recognize my animations aren't as good as many people on this site. Some people's videos are incredibly stunning. I think I am okay at using Raycast, which makes my videos look nicer, but my animations are not great. Getting all of the IK bones to cooperate is hard. Posing is tricky. Getting parts to line up always seems impossible. How can I improve my animations?

2018-12-14 19:13

I don't have any tips for self-made animations, but if you're using pre-made animations, there can be a wide variation for how those look depending on how they were created, and which model they were originally created for. Usually animations from motion capture look the smoothest. By contrast, manually created motions may not look very fluid or may even look jerky.

You'll likely get the best results if you use a model similar to the one the animation was originally made for. Sometimes the readme files will explain which model base it was designed for (e.g TDA, LAT, etc). Sometimes they'll include multiple versions of the motion for different models in which case you'll want to use the correct version or the closest version to the model you're using. However, I've still had to abandon some motions I DL'ed since they just looked awful even with the suggested model type.

Even when the motion is correct and it looks relatively good, I find I still need to make a few tweaks, usually to fix clipping issues (hands or arms going through other body parts, feet going through the floor, etc)

2018-12-16 00:51

One thing I found important to do is that if you need to achieve a certain movement, it's better if you can do that with as few joints as possible. Even if you achieve the same results by moving a large amount of joints, you might have rotated something in a particular way without realizing it (especially with limbs), and next time you touch an IK, something will spin in an unrealistic way and it'll become very hard to fix it.
If it happens and you can't go back, try to find a point where you can reset those joints, so that you won't have to carry this issue for the whole animation,

When you pose your character, try to move legs and arms a bit just to see that nothing looks off. Sometimes you'll realize that if, later, you need them to lift a limb, something will look very wrong, so before moving forward with the animation, ensure you won't encounter this problem. Usually you have to rotate the whole body in a certain direction and then act on the bust/hips joints to obtain a pose that looks the same, but won't have this issue later on.

I feel like it looks better when the whole body is moving. Say your character is standing, and lifts a leg: it's not normal for the rest of the body to remain perfectly still. This is usually pretty simple to do: just rotate the bust a bit and the whole upper body will move, even though you just changed 1 joint. Make sure the movement makes sense though: if your character lifts a leg, the torso shouldn't bend away from the leg: it should instead move forward, closer to the leg, to maintain balance.

Also, movement has acceleration and deceleration. If your character moves an arm from right to left, it won't all be done at the same speed. It will start slowly, then it'll speed up and, when reaching the wanted position, some of that momentum will still move the arm a bit while it's coming to a halt.
It's not hard to do: if you just register start and end position, you'll have that weird "robot" movement; but, if, afterwards, you register two in-between positions and move them further away from the two ends, you'll achieve that acceleration and deceleration, while the part in the middle will be faster.
Gentle movements usually have longer acceleration and deceleration periods, while with sudden movements (like a kick) they will be much smaller, but still be there.

I hope it helps

2019-01-07 11:43

This is really helpful. I find if I need to match two characters movements, using the curve makes it tricky for them to match.

2019-01-09 07:31

@Zokoth: To adjust acceleration, I think the interpolation curve (in the lower left corner of MMD) gives better results than adding addition keyframes.